Uses of Pronouns

Uses of Pronouns

Uses of Pronouns:

Uses of Pronouns

What is a Pronoun:

A Pronoun is a small word that is used in place of a noun to avoid the repetition of nouns. Every pronoun must have a clear antecedent (the word for which the pronoun stands).

For Example:

  • Shravan is a student and Shravan is studying in 4th standard. 
  • Shravan got a gold medal because Shravan secured 1st rank.

The above sentences look awkward because of the repetition of the word Shravan. They can be written in a better way in the following manner by the use of pronouns.

  • Shravan is a student and he is studying in 4th standard. 
  • Shravan got a gold medal because he secured 1st rank.

 

The Antecedent of a Pronoun:

Pronouns are generally used with reference to their antecedents.The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun or noun phrase being replaced by the pronoun. In the above sentences, the noun ‘Shravan’ is an antecedent.

 

Definition of a Pronoun

A Pronoun is a word used instead of a Noun or Noun Phrase.  (Pronoun means for- noun.)

A pronoun can act as a subject (I), object (me), or possessive (my or mine)

 

Some Common Pronouns:

I, me, he, she, herself, you, it, that, they, each, few, many, who, whoever, whose, someone, everybody, etc

 

Uses of Pronouns:

Let us learn the following rules to use the pronouns in an effective way without any mistakes.

 

The Pronoun should agree with the Noun in Number, Gender and Person.

Examples:

  • Joe is a good student.  He attends the classes regularly.
  • Rakul is a famous actress.  She won the best actress award.
  • Some students have finished their projects as per their schedule.
  • Renu did her homework and helped her brother.

 

When the Pronoun is used in Subjective Case, we use: I, we, you, he, she, it, they

Examples:

  • I certainly follow your instructions.
  • We are all students here.
  • She taught me English.
  • He and I will definitely support you.
  • They are good players.
  • You and I are in the race.

More Examples:

  • He and me are good friends. (incorrect)
  • He and I are good friends. (correct)

 

  • Satya and me have warned you about it. (incorrect)
  • Satya and I have warned you about it. (correct)

 

Subjective Case is used as the complement of the verb ‘to be’

Examples:

  • It is he who met you yesterday.
  • It is I who gave you that gift.
  • If I were you, I would consult a lawyer.
  • It was they who approached you.
  • It is she who helped you all the time.

 

The use of Pronoun after ‘than’, or ‘as’ should be a Subjective Case.

Examples:

  • She is taller than I (am) (not me)
  • She is smarter than he. (not him)
  • He is cleverer than they. (not them) 
  • Her brother is not more intelligent than she. (not her)

 

  • She is as tall as I
  • He is not as smart as she.
  • I am as clever as he

But we can say:

In the following sentences, both the subjective case or objective case can be used as per the meaning that we want to convey.

Examples:

  • I like her more than him. 

(I like her and him. But I like her more)

  • I like her more than he (likes).

(He and I like her. But I like more)

 

When the Pronoun is used in the Objective Case, we use –  me, us, you, him, her, it, them.

The pronoun can be used as a direct object, indirect object, and an object of a preposition in a sentence

Examples:

As a Direct Object:

Examples:

 

  • They want her to attend the event.
  • She supported them in the exam.
  • They appointed her and me.
  • He didn’t give me any information.

As an Indirect Object:

Examples:

  • She offered me a cup of coffee.
  • They gave the ranker a gift.
  • Mr. Reddy taught us English.

As an object of a preposition (after preposition)

Examples:

  • Are you speaking to them?
  • Is this shirt for me or him?
  • My son sent a mobile to me.
  • By whom were the instructions given to him?
  • He has complete faith in me.
  • She doesn’t do anything without me.
  • There should not be any secrets between her and me.

Uses of Pronouns: PDF Worksheet on Object of Preposition

 

With the words ‘let’, ‘looks’, ‘but’, ‘except’, we use the objective case, not the subjective case.

Examples:

  • Let me go there.
  • Let us know things clearly.
  • Don’t let him go all alone.
  • Let her explain the problem first.
  • Let them not go to that dangerous area.

 

  • He looks like me (not I)
  • Everybody went there but / expect me (not I)

 

It’s I or It’s Me:

The simple technique that we should remember here is – always use ‘I’ in the subject place and ‘Me’ in the object place.

Examples:

  • It’s I who made a call to you. (Subject)
  • Is it he who wants to buy the bike? (Subject)
  • It’s I who wanted to meet you. (Subject)
  • Is it she who copied the exam. (Subject)

 

  • It’s me who was asked to come there. (Object)
  • It’s me in the photo. (Object)

Remember:

  • It is I who is going there. (Incorrect)
  • It is I who am going there. (Correct)

 

  • It is you who is attending the classes. (Incorrect)
  • It is you who are attending the classes. (Correct)

 

  • It is we who has opened the door. (Incorrect)
  • It is we who have opened the door. (Correct)

 

When two or more Singular Nouns are joined by ‘and’, we use a Plural Pronoun.

Examples:

  • Rakul and Renu have attended the classes. They even finished their work.
  • Rakul, Renu, and Reena are good Tennis players.  They played in the recent national event.

 

When two or more Singular Nouns are joined by ‘and’ but refer to the same person or thing, we use a Singular Pronoun.

Examples:

  • The Principal and Correspondent has attended his duty.
  • The Director and Producer has proved his excellence in this film.
  • My Teacher and Mentor has given her consent for the tour.

Note:

If the two or more Singular Nouns refer to the different persons or things, we use a Plural Pronoun. 

Examples:

  • The Principal and the Correspondent have attended their duties.
  • The Director and the Producer have proved their excellence in this film.
  • My Teacher and my Mentor have given their consent for the tour.

 

When two or more Singular Nouns are joined by ‘and’ but preceded by ‘each’ and ‘every’, we use a Singular Pronoun.

Examples:

  • Each woman and each girl has expressed her opinion.
  • Each General and each soldier showed his willingness.

 

When two Singular Nouns are joined by ‘or’, either….or’, ‘neither…..nor’, we use a Singular Pronoun.

Examples:

  • Tinkoo or Ricky has not taken his breakfast.
  • Either Tinkoo or Ricky has finished his work.
  • Neither Tinkoo nor Ricky is available at his office.

 

When a Singular Noun and a Plural Noun are joined by ‘or’, either….or’, ‘neither…..nor’, we use a Plural Pronoun and Plural Noun should be near to the verb.

Examples:

  • The judge or the lawyers have expressed their different opinions.
  • Either the principal and the teachers are available in their cabins.
  • Neither the Manager nor employees have shown their interest in the new project.

The order of Personal Pronouns:

Order of preference when we use Pronouns:

When we use Pronouns that refer to different persons in a sentence, we generally follow the following order.

Singular Number:

2nd person + 3rd person + 1st person  (You + He + I)

Examples:

  • You, she and I will go there.
  • You and he can certainly do it.
  • He and I will do it for you.
  • You and I are good friends.

Plural Number:

1st Person + 2nd Person + 3rd Person

Examples:

  • We, you and they can participate in the seminar.
  • You and they will never compromise.
  • We and you could have been given equal rights.
  • All of us, some of you and all of them are willing to attend the classes.

More Examples:

Incorrect: He and myself are not suitable for it.

Correct: He and I are not suitable for it.

 

Incorrect: I, you and he can convince her.

Correct: You, he and I can convince her.

 

Incorrect: I and she can accompany you.

Correct:  She and I can accompany you.

 

Incorrect: He and you must attend the class.

Correct: You and he must attend the class.

 

Incorrect: I and you are not eligible for that.

Correct: You and I are not eligible for that.

 

When ‘I’ is joined by ‘and’ to the second or third person, we use a Plural Pronoun of first-person.

Examples:

  • Kavitha, you and I have to submit our research papers.
  • She and I have just finished our lunch.
  • You and I are supposed to give our opinion.

 

When a third person is joined by ‘and’ to the second person, we use a Pronoun of the second person.

Examples:

  • Have she and you finished your lunch?
  • You and he are supposed to give your opinion.

 

When a Pronoun is used for Collective Noun, we use the neuter gender –  

‘it’ or ‘its’ for Singular.

Examples:

  • The jury is present in the court. It is going to express its opinion on this case.
  • The family has divided its property into four parts.
  • The staff has received its work schedule.

 ‘They’ or ‘their’ for Plural

Examples:

  • The jury have been divided into two groups. They are going to express their opinion on this case.
  • The family have divided their property into four parts.
  • The staff have received their work schedule.

 

  • Uses of Pronouns PDF
  • Worksheets: Uses of Pronouns
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